Minneapolis and the World Need Less Policing, more Humanity

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On Sunday November 15, at 1AM  in Minneapolis police shot and killed a young Black man, Jamar Clark.. A protest began at 3pm on November 15 at the site of the shooting. Protesters demanded a release of the surveillance video, federal investigation, and arrest of the officers involved.   An occupation of the 4th precinct  continues as I write.  On the evening of November 16 protestors shut down of  I94  freeway for a couple hours, ending with the arrest of  40 activists including Minneapolis NAACP President Nekima Levy-Pounds.  Mayor Hodges requested a federal investigation this afternoon. The video has yet to be released. Witnesses say the man was handcuffed. Police say otherwise. Protesters fear tampering with the video. The occupation of the 4th precinct will continue until the demands are met. Tents have been set up outside the precinct, and a makeshift kitchen. Food and money donations are desired. 

#Occupy4thprecinct #Justice4Jamar

The last few days I have laid on my couch overcoming the flu. In my fevered state the stories of suicide bombers in Paris, Beirut and Iraq, and the death of the young man Jamar Clark, killed by a  Minneapolis police officer, overlapped. Among the clammer, a speech in my Facebook feed by Angela Davis celebrating  historian John Hope Franklin provided startling clarity among the din.

“We need more historically-minded people,” Davis said.

She did not mean people with their heads in the past, but those who see their present lives connected to past unfinished business  and a future bearing the fruits of their time on earth. They are not afraid to demand what can’t be achieved in their life time. Cognizant of historical roots of current problems, they  envision the future we need and a path to get there.

Davis illustrated what she meant, repeating the goals of her life work:  abolition of the prison system and law enforcement as we know it. “Take the guns from the police” she said. She does not believe her demands will happen in her life time, yet she paints for us a future in which security is based on the fulfillment of our needs for health, education, housing…

Events of the last days illustrate the wisdom of Davis’ vision. Law enforcement on November 15 did not provide security for a woman, a man or a neighborhood in North Minneapolis.

Police can’t address unmet human needs for decent jobs, affordable housing and well-funded schools  that would provide real security, but our tax dollars redirected can.

On a global level, Davis’ definition of security is as salient. As Mayors and Governors in the U.S. and World Leaders rush to build armies and police forces to “provide security” and  invoke America’s ugliest past by barring  Syrian refugees they deny the obvious.  Violence begets  violence.  We do not need to look very far back –– 9/11, Iraqi war! —  to understand that it will only make our future less secure.

#Occupy4thprecinct

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The Democratic (non) Debate on Foreign Policy

 

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As the United States and Russia expand their interventions in Syria and the presidential campaign heats up, the need for a transformation in the global polity in order to save the planet  — a point made by MLK (see above) almost 40 years ago and more urgent today —  is not being addressed.

While we fight for social justice at home, keeping the candidates feet to the fire with immigration, Black Lives Matter, 350.org and fight for $15 movements, we need to remember and remind those in power that without peace and global justice there will little progress at home.

Though the #Demsdebate was described in the mainstream media as a fight between Democratic Socialism and benign Capitalism, Bernie and Hillary’s agreements on foreign policy are a central problem for we, the people.

Naomi Klein is right to argue the times require a Change in Everything, including U.S. relations with the world. We need to demand a candidate with a global perspective, one who will tell the truth about the dangers of nationalism in the 21st century; one who understands that the issues we face internally have global consequences and global solutions.

I want a leader who will say out loud that the U.S. is the chief per-capita polluter, wealth extractor and weapons manufacturer. It is the power with the most military bases, billionaire investors, and corporate sweatshops. It is the greatest consumer of the world’s non-renewable resources.

The United States still has a prime role to play on the world stage but one that involves an about face: from world super power to global leader in redistribution of wealth and demilitarization, chief elevator of labor and human rights and prime mitigator of climate change.

I’d like to see a candidate who will prioritize education, not to compete with the Chinese but because education is a right of all children on the planet, a candidate who will oppose the TPP not just because it will hurt workers in the U.S., but because it will hurt workers everywhere, especially in the global south

A global capitalist economy that measures success by increasing consumption is destroying the ecology of mother earth. As chief global capitalist that buck stops with the United States. . I want a president who realizes that tackling climate change and global redistribution of wealth are one and the same.

If we elevate labor everywhere and dismantle the military industrial complex we will naturally slow migration streams, because we will be protecting the right of people to stay home. Then we can tear down our walls, open our borders; let Wall Street run a labor and environmental obstacle course to apply for a temporary visa.

There is much we need to do on the home front: tackle racism, homophobia, rape culture, gun violence, mass incarceration, crumbling infrastructure, health care, education. The candidates are talking about some of these things, but they are not telling us that we can’t do them without changing our global priorities. Remember how the War on Poverty got consumed by the war in Vietnam?

We need money for social justice at home, not Empire-building abroad.

The planet is small and connected. That’s not left or right. It’s our 21st century reality.

Moon’s eye view of two U.S. social movements.

 

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It is hard to get a perspective on the strength of social movements from the ground. The influences ripple and it is hard to pinpoint cause and effect. Sometimes when the backlash is fierce and the infighting gets ugly it can feel as though you are working at cross purposes. We need a moon’s eye view to see where the tide is going. So while everyone else was admiring the blood moon eclipse, I slipped away to the moon.

From up here I see the Black Lives Matter movement spreading and deepening. I see politicians like Elizabeth Warren make it a point to speak up for the movement, though the group has been explicit about their refusal to back the Democratic party.   That is influence.  It is also influence when the Minnesota Governor who called the #Blackfair demonstration “inappropriate” is now talking about the need for affirmative action at the Minnesota State Fair. It may be harder to connect things like the Minnesota Children’s Theater’s Afrocentric season to the social movement, but let me tell you,  from the moon it is clear -on all levels the culture is taking notice.

However, from my perch on the moon I see the peace movement, working hard but spinning wheels, losing opportunities, fighting over Syria- the character of the Assad regime — dividing and conquering themselves when they should be uniting forces in support of Syrian refugees and against U.S. intervention. They are losing out on opportunities to build a mass movement against the militarization of our police and our southern border and against drone warfare. They are not capitalizing on what Obama calls “war- weariness”  – anti war sentiment that has spread to all corners.

Hmm, I think I’ll stay up here on the moon. So much easier to comment from a perch than to face the music on earth.